Memory formation influenced by how brain networks develop during youth

In a new, rare study of direct brain recordings in children and adolescents, scientists have discovered as brains mature, the precise ways by which two key memory regions in the brain communicate make us better at forming lasting memories. The findings also suggest how brains learn to multitask with age. Historically, a lack of high-resolution data from children's brains have led to gaps in our understanding of how the developing brain forms memories. The study innovated the use of intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) on pediatric patients to examine how brain development supports memory development.